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    tomekbr82's Avatar
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    Refrigerant identify



    Hallo
    I have a question how to identify what kind of refrigerant is in the bottle or device . Could you explain how to identify the refrigerant when i know the pressure in bottle/device and ambient temperature. (I will be glad if you explain that on Pressure-Enthalpy Chart ).



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    Re: Refrigerant identify

    hi tom ,
    if you get the temp of the gas in a bottle< from the outside< and you use a suction gauge on the same bottle , you now have a pressure AND A TEMPRITURE, from that using a comparitor at one time all engineers carried this tool to see at what temp the system the system was running at, hope this helps = sedgy

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    Re: Refrigerant identify

    or just go off the colour of the bottles

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    Brian_UK is online now Moderator I am starting to push the Mods: of RE Site Moderator : and general nice guy
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    Re: Refrigerant identify

    Bottle temperature and pressure may not work with modern blends, sadly.
    Brian - Newton Abbot, Devon, UK
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    Re: Refrigerant identify

    Pressure/Temperature would give you an idea but like Brian_UK said with modern refrigerant blends you can't be 100% certain! I think you can send samples away for analysis but thats expensive...never done it myself, im sure it would be cheaper just to ditch the "unknown" refrigerant bottle and buy a new known one...

    J

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian_UK View Post
    Bottle temperature and pressure may not work with modern blends, sadly.

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    Re: Refrigerant identify

    Quote Originally Posted by tomekbr82 View Post
    Hallo
    I have a question how to identify what kind of refrigerant is in the bottle or device . Could you explain how to identify the refrigerant when i know the pressure in bottle/device and ambient temperature. (I will be glad if you explain that on Pressure-Enthalpy Chart ).
    I agree with what has been said already.

    The temperature of the cylinder and the pressure of the refrigerant will
    give you the type of refigerant when using a compariter or Pressure enthalpy chart.

    You need to take the temperature of the cylinder and then measure the pressure
    and find which refrigerant is nearest to your readings and that should be the refrigerant.

    The trouble is as Brian pointed out the majority of new refrigerants are blends and blends
    will (dependant on what blend it is) glide over more than one temperature.
    So trying to find the type of a blended refrigerant is not as exact as it was with single pure
    fluids.

    If you suspect the refrigerant has leaked out of a system, then the only realy accurate way
    of identifying the refrigerant is by sending it away for testing.

    If the refrigerant is a 400 series refrigerant then it will be a blend and normal pressure
    temp relationships are more complicated.

    Rob

    .

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    Re: Refrigerant identify

    sorry gents , well it seams like it was 200 years since I last worked = sedgy.

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    Re: Refrigerant identify

    Good morning
    My two cents worth. It also depends on whether you can trust your supplier. I'm presently working in Equatorial Guinea and recently our normal supply shipments were delayed and some R22 was sourced "locally" via Nigeria. All the right packaging, colour, sealed, but definitely not R22. Temp / Press looked close to R134A. Luckily my tech noticed on the first unit he was working on.

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