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  1. #1
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    Condensor split temperature



    I encountered already several times in literature the term ' Condensor split temperatures' What does this mean because I never heard of it before and can't find it in the books I have.


    It's better to keep your mouth shut and give the impression that you're stupid than to open it and remove all doubt.

  2. #2
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    I could be wrong, but when I hear condenser split temp, I think of the ambient temperature where we shut down half the condenser. This being the condenser split temperature.

    Norty

  3. #3
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    hi peter,

    condenser split temp is the diference between the air temp entering the coil and air temp leaving the coil.

    There is also an evaporator split temp.


    Chemi

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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    3 different answers now.
    It's better to keep your mouth shut and give the impression that you're stupid than to open it and remove all doubt.

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    Re: Condenser split temperature

    Mine is the right one ,

    Of course

    I saw it in commissioning forms on the web, so it must be true.

    have a go yourself:
    http://www.google.com/search?sourcei...it+temperature

    Chemi

  6. #6
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    Copied an pasted

    Splits, Swings, And Loads
    In air-cooled condensers, the temperature difference between the ambient and the condensing temperature is referred to as the condenser split. For example, if the condensing temperature is 110 degrees F and the ambient is 80 degrees, the condenser split would be 30 degrees.

    (The condensing temperature in any system is figured off of the condensing pressure using a pressure-temperature chart.)

    Condenser splits can range from 15 degrees to 30 degrees, depending on whether the condenser is a standard-, mid-, or high-efficiency unit. The higher the efficiency, the more coil surface area there will be, thus the lower the condenser split will be.

    In this article we will discuss a standard-efficiency condenser that normally runs a 25 degree to 30 degree split. Note that condenser splits are not affected by ambient temperature changes. If there is an increase in the ambient temperature, there will also be an increase in the condensing temperature, but the condenser split (difference between the two temperatures) will remain the same.

    On the other hand, condensing temperatures for a single condenser can vary depending on two factors: the ambient swing and the evaporator heating load.

    As the ambient temperature increases, less heat can be rejected from the air-cooled condenser to the hotter ambient. Therefore, more of the heat absorbed by the evaporator and suction line, as well as the heat of compression generated by the compressor, will remain in the condenser. This increases the condenserís internal temperature and pressure. The condenser is now operating at an elevated condensing temperature for the elevated ambient; the difference between the condensing temperature and the ambient (condenser split) remains the same.

    On the other hand, if the evaporator sees more of a heat load, more heat has to be rejected to the condenser; its condensing temperature increases. With an increased condensing temperature, the condenser split is increased because the ambient temperature remained the same.
    It's better to keep your mouth shut and give the impression that you're stupid than to open it and remove all doubt.

  7. #7
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter_1
    3 different answers now.
    Chemi has given you the correct answer

    Victor

  8. #8
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    The term is actually referred to as "Temperature Split" not split temperature.

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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    Hi Peter in Belgium.

    I have also heard the term "temperature split" used before and it means the difference between the air temperature and the saturated refrigerant temperature (which is implied, but not talked about) and most often used for air-cooled condensers or air-cooling evaporators.

    I think it is a bad term to use because it does not describe anything, other than it somehow relates to temperature.

    For me, this term is just some old language that won't die.
    If all else fails, ask for help.


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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    I think it can or has also been called approach temp. although when I hear cond. split I think entering and exiting temps of the coil. Some mfg's here in the US will give ideal delta T's for their equipment. I'll try and find one. The Testo guide below explains the way you are referring which I would think would be better called over cond. over ambient temps.

    http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/6/...Guide_2007.pdf


    page 35.
    Last edited by BigJon3475; 10-07-2008 at 02:11 AM.

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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    In air-cooled condensers, the temperature difference between the ambient and the condensing temperature is referred to as the condenser split. For example, if the condensing temperature is 110 degrees F and the ambient is 80 degrees, the condenser split would be 30 degrees. Condenser splits can range from 15 degrees to 30 degrees, depending on whether the condenser is a standard-, mid-, or high-efficiency unit. The higher the efficiency, the more coil surface area there will be, thus the lower the condenser split will be. Actually the temp. on and temperature off is the temperature split but the actual heat transfer is between the desuperheating, condensing and sub cooling taking place between the refrigerant and the ambient temperature thus (Condensing split)
    Last edited by wambat; 10-07-2008 at 02:51 AM. Reason: more information

  12. #12
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter_1 View Post
    I encountered already several times in literature the term ' Condensor split temperatures' What does this mean because I never heard of it before and can't find it in the books I have.
    Condenser split temperature is the temperature difference between the condensing temperature and the ambient air temperature. So for the condenser to reject the absorbed heat, it must be higher than the ambient air temperature.

  13. #13
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by phxhvac View Post
    Condenser split temperature is the temperature difference between the condensing temperature and the ambient air temperature. So for the condenser to reject the absorbed heat, it must be higher than the ambient air temperature.
    I've seen that avatar before

  14. #14
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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    I was taught that the term was called the CCD or correct condensing temperature. This was determined by predicting what the CCD should be and then comparing what you actually have. You then compare the two, to see if it was high or low .....
    This is done by measuring the air temp around the condenser coil and then reading the high side pressure. Then check what the actual condensing temp of the refrigerant is inside the condenser coil from the TP chart. Now comparing the delta T of the actual condenser saturated temp and the ambient air temp gives you the ACTUAL CCD, or that which has been refered to as the condenser split.
    My wife says I don't listen to her....or something like that....

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    Re: Condensor split temperature

    Difference between entering air and leaving air = delta-T or dT
    Difference between entering air and saturation temp = TD
    Difference between leaving air and saturation temp = Approach

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