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View Full Version : Ideal Solinoid valve placment?







The MG Pony
29-04-2006, 07:06 AM
I'm building a small 1/2ton system with a pump down cycle, Now I've been wondering where the ideal placment would be for the NC Valve, I'm thinking the best would be close to the TVX as possible to keep the liquid line flooded. Does this sound like a good Idea?

Right now there are no fixed numbers, I'm just building the basic frame work and part possitions.

Brian_UK
29-04-2006, 09:10 PM
With the NC valve close to the TXV you will reduce vibration and possible liquid hammer inside the pipework when the valve opens releasing a slug of high pressure liquid.

A long run after the NC can create problems such as those above, it will also make your pumpdown take longer as the liquid has to pass through the TXV etc.

Dan
29-04-2006, 10:09 PM
I'm building a small 1/2ton system with a pump down cycle, Now I've been wondering where the ideal placment would be for the NC Valve, I'm thinking the best would be close to the TVX as possible to keep the liquid line flooded. Does this sound like a good Idea?

Yes. Also, be sure to place it in a serviceable position.

The MG Pony
30-04-2006, 12:00 AM
Ya thats what I was thinking, it will reduce alot of things in a good way by placing it inches away from the TXV rather then at the plant its self, and at the plant have a manual Valve that is hand opperated right after the receiver to enable service of the TXV, Valve, Sight Glass, Filter dryer.

So: Conedencer > Receiver > Hand Valve (NO) > Filter/Dryer > Sight Glass > ~?distance?~ > Solinoid Valve (NC) > ~ a fiew inches but no more then a foot ~ > TXV.

That sound good? This will run paralell to the suction line and be Insulated well.

and as to whether it is a good idea or not is what I'm asking lol but I imagin that a liquid line aut to be flooded with liquid? would it not?

The MG Pony
30-04-2006, 12:05 AM
Oh and don't worry I all ways design every thing super easy to service, drives me nuts how some make some thing that is near impossible to assemble let alone fix should it fail!

I find if you build it logical and throughly Analise your design with a common sense out look it will all ways come out as robust and reliable yet easy to fix and maintain :)