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View Full Version : Is a Leak Repair a Worthwhile Thing To Do







Brian_UK
05-10-2015, 04:44 PM
Saw this in Cooling Post. Would the power that write the laws consider it I wonder.

http://www.coolingpost.com/world-news/repairing-small-leaks-may-be-harmful/

chemi-cool
05-10-2015, 06:09 PM
After VW fiasco, I'm not sure if I can trust European CO2 emissions data.

There is no realistic solution in the article, manufacturers should have the light on production lines, that's the weakest link.

hookster
05-10-2015, 08:20 PM
There is a notable observation in the article
The report points out the value of shut-off valves to avoid draining the entire plant to perform the repair.

In my opinion shut off valves on systems should be a mandatory inclusion in construction design.

cadwaladr
08-10-2015, 12:28 AM
Yes that's a strange question,although my guru who taught me at college back in yesteryear said repair all leaks no matter what,leak detectors ppm is bull soapy water was around before them!

Rob White
08-10-2015, 11:08 AM
There is a notable observation in the article

In my opinion shut off valves on systems should be a mandatory inclusion in construction design.

That is a valid point and I would add isolation valves with access points so
gauges can be fitted and refrigerant removed, pressure tests and vac carried out.

Regards

Rob

.

chemi-cool
08-10-2015, 03:46 PM
That is a valid point and I would add isolation valves with access points so
gauges can be fitted and refrigerant removed, pressure tests and vac carried out.

Regards

Rob

.

sooner or later all valves are leaking.
using thicker wall copper and better brazing rods will have a better impact.

Frikkie
04-12-2015, 09:55 PM
Every time I come to this forum I have amazement at how the regulations progress and even more amazement at how far it is between practices in Europe and practices in Africa. 5 grams each year is a very very small amount of gas, I didn't know it was even possible to locate such a small leak. I don't understand why the leak size allowed is so low if the new generation gasses are environment friendly.

Grizzly
05-12-2015, 05:21 AM
Hi Frikkie.

Good points raised which have been questions of many on this forum.
Simply put there are 2 types of regulation.
1) Those that are made in the Interest of Safety! (Inc. Environmental Issues.)
(Usually evolved through best Practice.)

2) Those that are made in the Interest of Individuals and Corporations.
(Read Limiting Liability and or self promotion))

This subject is a red rag to a bull to most on the forum.
But in fairness Progress stops for no man!
Ask the generation before Me, who were sometimes not able to even access a site (to carry out Work) without the correct Union Card.

When I was talking to a Ex British Leyland Apprentice the other day (From the "Red Robbo" Days!)

I discovered that way back then when the Militant Unionist Workforce were always on strike.
That many times the strikes were created by the site Management winding the Workers up.

To generate a strike so that they took the blame for lost production. When in reality their production targets were never going to be met, due to very poor management.
So even back then KPI's and manipulation of the truth existed.
Different Day, Same Dollar.

Health and Safety / Environmental Officers etc. Are no different from you and I!
With regard to wanting to Do a decent Days work and do it well!
The sad thing is we are rarely working towards the same set of rules or goals.
AND That is just those of us that want to comply!

The beauty of things now is we all have a social voice, via forums like these etc.

Finally in answer to your Last sentence, Who would make any money?
Grizzly

hookster
06-12-2015, 09:49 AM
Every time I come to this forum I have amazement at how the regulations progress and even more amazement at how far it is between practices in Europe and practices in Africa. 5 grams each year is a very very small amount of gas, I didn't know it was even possible to locate such a small leak. I don't understand why the leak size allowed is so low if the new generation gasses are environment friendly.

Unfortunately there are no environment friendly refrigerants, only less unfriendly than others! :(
The one with the lowest impact is probably Ammonia but Both gaseous and particulate ammonia contribute to eutrophication (http://ammoniabmp.colostate.edu/link%20pages/impacts%20of%20ammonia.html#eutro) of surface waters, soil acidification (http://ammoniabmp.colostate.edu/link%20pages/impacts%20of%20ammonia.html#soilacid), fertilization of vegetation (http://ammoniabmp.colostate.edu/link%20pages/impacts%20of%20ammonia.html#vegfert), changes in ecosystems (http://ammoniabmp.colostate.edu/link%20pages/impacts%20of%20ammonia.html#ecochange),and smog and decreased visibility (http://ammoniabmp.colostate.edu/link%20pages/impacts%20of%20ammonia.html#smog) in cities and pristine areas.

Don't get me started on CO2 where these refrigerant plants are newly installed leaking like sieves and purged to atmosphere. Yet our biggest CO2 impact on the earth is our use of fossil fuels and production of protein as a food source.

We are just an easy target and controllable industry but I would accept any improvements we can make to the environment however small while I sit in my diesel chomping, CO2 emitting van stuck in the M25 traffic while I contemplate arriving at my next job to prevent my quota of 5g leaks for the year.

PaulZ
10-12-2015, 01:35 AM
Hi Hookster
Well put.
The refrigeration industry has always been an easy target and probably always will.
As with any research it depends how you interpret the results, there could be some truth in the story from Cooling Post.
Regards
Paul

vikky1971
15-12-2015, 12:21 PM
I too agree, the provision of isolating valves before and after the dryer and a non return filling valve to made mandatory even in smallest of the air con or fridge system