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US Iceman
12-04-2006, 10:22 PM
Some discussion has been occurring on the use of heat pumps and renewable technologies for industrial applications. During some surfing several links were found that may prove interesting to some of you.

Maybe we can generate some good discussions on the use of heat pumps and the various refrigerants that can be used.

One more way a refrigeration system can be used... :cool:

http://ehpn.fiz-karlsruhe.de/en/


http://sherhpa.fiz-karlsruhe.de/en/


http://www.heatpumpcentre.org/Publications/Case_Studies.asp

Lc_shi
13-04-2006, 01:56 AM
Oil shortage surely need more high effeicient ways of energy use. Heat pump is the very choice. I pay special attention at ground source heat pump. May be the best way is to combine it with building.
I think most application of heat pump should be in the AC field but the excavation cost limit its use in small system . In building dense country like China,how to use GHPs is a challenging job:)
I hope this threas can get together a team to lead this topic to the depth.

best regards
LC

NoNickName
13-04-2006, 07:23 AM
Interesting links.
On HPs, much has been said. Convenience is contradictory, especially in northern europe, canada and north USA. In general terms, in continental countries over 55° latitude HPs are not a high efficient way of using energy.

GHPs are much better in terms of performance, and we are pushing a lot on this.

milo
13-04-2006, 08:43 AM
I found this story
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060407/sc_nm/environment_sewers_dc
Cant say I'm looking forward to the hands on work :rolleyes:

dogma
13-04-2006, 09:54 AM
I found this story
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060407/sc_nm/environment_sewers_dc
Cant say I'm looking forward to the hands on work :rolleyes:

unreal. It seems, no matter how uncomfortable the big chemical and oil companies are about renewable energy and green refrigerants, the public consensis is winning.

Even companies like coka-cola and putting funds into CO2 technology. I Think the reality is that these technologies, including solar refrigeration are going to become very common place in the industry. And sooner than anyone had antisipated.

:eek: :eek: :eek:

NoNickName
13-04-2006, 11:10 AM
Amazing. HFS, Heat from ****.
Now, it sounds anachronistic to know some countries are still using R12 and R22, and farwesterners own cars with a fuel consumption of 10 miles a gallon, while in Europe we do all efforts to hurt our economy by spending money on such HFS projects.

Peter_1
13-04-2006, 11:52 AM
I hope this threas can get together a team to lead this topic to the depth.

Till what depth LC ?:p

US Iceman
13-04-2006, 02:24 PM
Hi Milo,

This is a very good link you have posted. I think this shows there are good alternatives , and many sources where heat pumps can be used.

I was a little surprised they decided to use the raw sewage, however, the article does not really provide too many technical details.

Somewhere in the past I seem to remember the sewage systems use a rotating screen/filter in the primary flow to separate the large particles (rats was the term used in the article).

One project I was involved in was similar to this except we were using the clarified water (what they call brown water I believe) as the source for the heat. This was essentially clean water, but not potable.

The system consisted of several large chillers with water cooled condensers. Heat was pulled from the clarified water and transferred to large manufacturing buildings across the road.

This is exactly the the type of technology transfer we need to see occur to assist in the reduction of our dependency on primary fuel sources.

While some members may say this is a waste of money, I completely disagree. This is most definitely a case of a wise investment into a proactive solution.

I believe we will begin to see more of this as energy continues to become more and more expensive. Some may stick their heads in the sand and say this will never happen, some are more energetic to understand and attempt.:cool:

Thank you for sharing this with us.

US Iceman
13-04-2006, 03:16 PM
Here are some other interesting examples of heat recovery, one is using a heat pump in a ventilation system.

And another reclaiming heat from a compressed air system.

http://www.energy.ca.gov/reports/2003-11-18_500-03-096-A13.PDF

http://www.gfxtechnology.com/GFX-STAR.html

http://www.heatpumpcentre.org/About_heat_pumps/HP_industry.asp

http://www.compressedairchallenge.org/content/library/factsheets/factsh10.pdf

http://europa.eu.int/comm/energy_transport/atlas/htmlu/hptortech.html

Brian_UK
13-04-2006, 10:40 PM
One thing in their favour with the Swedish system is that the country has been using district heating systems for years and can take advantage of that.

Here in the UK, for example, there are few of these schemes. The problem with all of these ideas, I believe, is getting the accountants to see the bigger picture.

US Iceman
14-04-2006, 02:31 AM
The problem with all of these ideas, I believe, is getting the accountants to see the bigger picture

Bingo, I think you have nailed the problem Brian. Your other point is well taken about the district heating systems.

This does provide a lot more flexibility in what can be provided as the infrastructure is already there. Developing this concept from scratch would require some enormous capital investment.

Which can be one of the obstacles to overcome for these systems to be economically feasible.

Andy
14-04-2006, 07:29 PM
I found this story
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060407/sc_nm/environment_sewers_dc
Cant say I'm looking forward to the hands on work :rolleyes:

I am working on the design for a 350kW system at the moment.

All food factories have effulent plants, with the waste at between 20 and 30 deg c. Also laundry plant wastes heat at these temperatures and higher;)

Way to go I think.

Kind Regards. Andy:)