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Roberto Cancio
01-09-2014, 10:47 PM
Dear Friends

I still do not know which fluid to use to replace R22 to systems in operation .
What gas should I use to replace R22 in new projects?
There is a fluid definitive to replace the R22 ?
I did a study in 2008 and found that Europe condemned the use of ISEON ( DuPont )

mattmechanic
02-09-2014, 12:31 PM
there is a product out called superchange by cliplight I think it was
its is a oil additive to make mineral oil mix with hcfc refrigerants

mattmechanic
02-09-2014, 12:33 PM
there is a product out called superchange by cliplight I think it was
its is a oil additive to make mineral oil mix with hcfc refrigerants

kiwi
27-11-2014, 02:55 AM
I have yet to see a refrigerant that has this problem sorted in retrofit.
Many are blends without enough field time for me to be comfortable. I have seen a number of open drive retrofits with new generation refrigerant go bad due to material incompatabilites.
R134a in new projects would be a safe bet as it has both lower ODP and GWP. The COP in certain application is better, but due to refrigerant dynamics often requires considerably larger swept volume machines increasing capital cost.
R407F has gained some credibility but i have yet to do much with it.
NH3 is the best solution but it is relative to the size of your project.

sphere478
27-11-2014, 05:59 AM
read a study a while back touting how you could replace r12 quite effectively with 95% r134a 5% r600a

I imagine if you found a refrigerant with a pressure/temp curve close to what you want you can solve oil return by adding a hydrocarbon. i've actually done it before once or twice on some of my own personal projects.

hotshot i believe contains r600 and they claim to be able to charge 22 systems (hotshot two is it? can't remember) but like said above i too have seen r407 getting more popular as of late. might look into that :-)

kiwi
27-11-2014, 07:16 PM
read a study a while back touting how you could replace r12 quite effectively with 95% r134a 5% r600a

I imagine if you found a refrigerant with a pressure/temp curve close to what you want you can solve oil return by adding a hydrocarbon. i've actually done it before once or twice on some of my own personal projects.

hotshot i believe contains r600 and they claim to be able to charge 22 systems (hotshot two is it? can't remember) but like said above i too have seen r407 getting more popular as of late. might look into that :-)
I'd expect the R600 is only added to improve oil return.