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eire1
12-01-2014, 10:07 PM
Hi guys, just wondering if anyone knows of any tools for correct pipe sizing? I'm still always getting confused.

An engineer that I used to know had what can only be described as a flat piece of copper with the different sizes cut out. You'd then place your pipe in the cut outs to determine the correct size. It wasn't home made, can't remember the make though.
I've tried wholesalers here but nobody has a clue what I'm on about.

Anyone know of any tools I could buy?

Thanks

install monkey
12-01-2014, 11:12 PM
1 of each sized flare nut??:p

monkey spanners
13-01-2014, 12:21 AM
Sometimes if i'm not sure ill put an adjustable spanner round the pipe and either read off the scale on it if it has one or use a tape measure to measure the gap in the jaws.

Rob White
13-01-2014, 01:55 AM
Hi guys, just wondering if anyone knows of any tools for correct pipe sizing? I'm still always getting confused.

An engineer that I used to know had what can only be described as a flat piece of copper with the different sizes cut out. You'd then place your pipe in the cut outs to determine the correct size. It wasn't home made, can't remember the make though.
I've tried wholesalers here but nobody has a clue what I'm on about.

Anyone know of any tools I could buy?

Thanks

There was a copper one a few years back but I think it was a freebee from
a pipe manufacturer. Although there are a lot of them kicking around you
will struggle to find new ones now.

There was a plastic one, that was sold but I don't think they are in stock now.

If you want you could make one.

Use a large diameter pipe and cut a piece about 4 or 5 inches long
slit it open and flatten it out. Draw a half circle from a selection of
pipes. You could do 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 3/4 and 7/8 and then cut and file
to shape. I got the lads to do them in college and it looked good and
did not take long. If you measure it well and place the half cut pipe holes
in the best location down both sides then you can make it about 3" by 2".

Another method commonly used is to cut a selection of pipes about half
an inch long and thread them through a large key ring or even make a ring
out of brazing rod.

Regards

Rob

.

cadwaladr
13-01-2014, 03:22 AM
the adjustable and steel ruler the best idea,works for me,slide rule?

bigspee
13-01-2014, 08:01 PM
Flaring tool vice? Just put it around the pipe and that will tell you the size??

bigspee
13-01-2014, 08:04 PM
Flairing* any the hole in the vice will tell you what size it is

install monkey
13-01-2014, 10:27 PM
you pick it up over time, pipe sizing- until then its usually stamped on fittings and down the seam of the pipe with the manufacturer too;)

bigor_2
14-01-2014, 02:34 PM
I use adjustable wrench.
11102

eire1
14-01-2014, 08:03 PM
Another method commonly used is to cut a selection of pipes about half
an inch long and thread them through a large key ring or even make a ring
out of brazing rod.

Regards

Rob

.

I might try that, make's perfect sense.

Thanks for all your suggestions, keep em coming.

Lastguest
15-01-2014, 03:53 PM
Hi Mitsubishi Electric uk gave my engineer one for free. it was card not copper but did the trick. try them they are based in manchester Uk. Unfortunately we use imperial sizes so in standard copper installations they go:

1/4 3/8 1/2 5/8 3/4 7/8 1/18 1/38 1/58 and so on. You can also but a cheap vernier gauge

In steel it is different

Lastguest

install monkey
11-04-2014, 08:34 PM
have you read the other posts- what the f**k has weighing scales got to do with this??:mad:

r.bartlett
11-04-2014, 09:08 PM
have you read the other posts- what the f**k has weighing scales got to do with this??:mad:

cut a metre off each size and weigh it. then when you are unsure of what size it is cut a metre and weigh that. Compare against your size V weight chart and bingo

This will only work if you cut exactly a metre as too much or too little will affect the weight. Also you must make sure you are working in the same gravitational pull as when you first weighed. If for example you weighed it on earth and you tried this method whilst working on the Hubble telescope in deep space for example you could get very confuzzed. Other than that it's 100% fool proof.

As an aside my ex's father was heavily involved in the Hubble program and talked me through the Hubble telescope refrigeration system which was needed to keep the lens from distorting.