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Python49
12-09-2013, 10:48 PM
I was told mixed information by distributors from carpigiani whether their machine will work in the country I am buying it for. The machine is from their USA website but I'd like to buy a 2nd hand unit for use abroad. The country I'm residing in uses something like 380-400V for 3 phase and 50hz I was told, the specs on this machine say 208/230V, 3 phase 60hz (http://www.carpigiani.com/usa/binary_files/prodotti/LB_202_G_RTX_42357.pdf). Will this work here?

The Viking
12-09-2013, 10:57 PM
It might work straight out of the box if you are lucky, otherwise you will need something like THIS (http://www.advancedpowercontrols.com/efc3.htm)

:cool:

Python49
12-09-2013, 11:12 PM
Also, if it won't run and I need a converter, can someone tell me which converter I should be looking for?

Python49
12-09-2013, 11:15 PM
Ahhh, thank you for fast response, didn't even see it prior to responding. Is there a way to tell if it will work on 50hz right out of the box based on the spec sheet or must I call carpigiani only? Also, I'm not an electrician and am a little worried, but is there a chance of getting the machine I'm buying here, then some local electrician not using the converter correctly and blowing out a $6000+ machine if they don't use the converter correctly? Similar to how easy it is to blow out a 100V small appliance if plugged into 220V?

r.bartlett
12-09-2013, 11:38 PM
Ahhh, thank you for fast response, didn't even see it prior to responding. Is there a way to tell if it will work on 50hz right out of the box based on the spec sheet or must I call carpigiani only? Also, I'm not an electrician and am a little worried, but is there a chance of getting the machine I'm buying here, then some local electrician not using the converter correctly and blowing out a $6000+ machine if they don't use the converter correctly? Similar to how easy it is to blow out a 100V small appliance if plugged into 220V?

It will run very fast then blow up spectacular fashion. Proper converter rated for the induction load not the running is the only way. You are better sourcing from a UK supplier and get the right one.I know a UK to Africa exporter who can sort it for you

http://www.carpigiani.com/uk/index.html?pg=299&langid=8&lngid=8&stid=4

Python49
13-09-2013, 12:09 AM
Hmmm, yeah, the only problem is that there seem to be a few much better deals for the American listed models online. The supplier you know is a distributor of used carpigiani machines from UK to Africa? If so, PM me his contact info, that would be great.

I will talk to him but can you (or someone else) explain why the machine I was looking at here: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Carpigiani-Gelato-Machine-LB-202-G-/290971917683?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43bf471d73 which is listed as an LB 202g model, isn't listed on carpigiani's website or ANY where on the internet? All I can find is lb 200b, 200g tronic, and 202g RTX, but all the RTX machines have the "RTX" written on right side of machine, whereas theirs doesn't. Are they listing the model wrong or is it just really hard to find a spec sheet of the 202g model?

Someone also told me the 202g model wouldn't have trouble running on 50hz, it's just the RTX that does, is that correct?

r.bartlett
13-09-2013, 01:01 PM
I wouldn't go the second hand route. I would ask camp uk if they have any refurbished units suitable. Past that new is the way to go

nike123
13-09-2013, 02:08 PM
I would ask Carpigiani folks, on e-mail message, all these questions!

chilliwilly
13-09-2013, 10:30 PM
The mains supply in North America for domestic/residential and small commercial buildings is 240v/120v/208v. "240v between phases. 120v to earth, and 208v to earth deriving from 120x root 3.

They have two phases @240v/60hz supplied to homes to power loads higher than 2.3kw, and use only one leg of the phase with a neutral @120v from a centre tapped delta configured local transformer feeding the building for lower loads. Just as you would with any single phase circuit. The 208v is used if one of the local transformer windings is damaged, to offer a voltage to supply higher than 120v and nearer to 240v so the applied load will still work but not as good as its designed to.

208v is derived by using the same centre tapping and the opposite phase connection on the delta windings, A-B-C would be the phase connections offering 240v, centre taps between these points, A-B or C will offer 0 volts and are earth spiked/grounded. A connection between A" and the centre tap between B"-C" will offer 208 volts, as would B" and a centre tap between C"-A"...; and any centre tap between points B-C, A-B, and A-C will offer 120v.

If you connect it straight to a 230v/240v supply @50 hz it should work, but will run slightly hotter due to the 60hz design. Your country will have a wiring system similar to UK and Europe and the rest of the world except North America. And you will be able to obtain 240v supply from your mains, either for an electric cooker or an electric shower. I can't see all outlets being 380/400v, but I will stand corrected if I'm wrong?

Don't be confused about 3 phase outside north America, when its stamped on a machine it usually means 240v, as they also have an industrial/large commercial 480v 3 phase system as well as the residential 240v 3 phase, along with single phase 270v for lighting loads in large buildings.

You could use a transformer to reduce the voltage to around 208v -220v to compensate for the frequency difference, and allow it to run cooler, but maybe for slightly longer due to the slightly lower voltage.

Hope this helps.