PDA

View Full Version : help! Is R123 stable under high temperatures ( eg.250F)?







icheal
14-03-2013, 02:11 AM
hey guys
i'm currently working on an ORC project that utilizing R123 as a working fluid to generate power.
R123 is supposed to work at much higher temperatures than that in a chiller, usually above 210F(in my case it's 250F).
one thing that worries me is that i cannot find any information about it's stability under high temperatures. dose it decompose or have some chemical reaction with metals, oils etc.
please help me ~thank you

Rob White
14-03-2013, 09:24 AM
hey guys
i'm currently working on an ORC project that utilizing R123 as a working fluid to generate power.
R123 is supposed to work at much higher temperatures than that in a chiller, usually above 210F(in my case it's 250F).
one thing that worries me is that i cannot find any information about it's stability under high temperatures. dose it decompose or have some chemical reaction with metals, oils etc.
please help me ~thank you


If you look at it on a ph chart

10125

You will see that at 20bara it is at about 150 degC.
250 degF is only about 120 deg C which is a pressure of about 12 bara.

It should be stable at that temperature.

Regards

Rob

.

icheal
20-03-2013, 07:00 AM
thanks for your reply, Rob!
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140700797000431
plz refer to this article. it says that, for example, R141b is only stable under 90degreee centigrade.
but if you look into a p-h diagram of R141b, 90 degree dosent even surpass its own critical temperature.

so,what i want to know is , is R123 unstable when temperature surpasses a certain degree? and what is the approximate temperature?

Rob White
20-03-2013, 09:50 AM
.

I may be wrong on this point so don't hold me to it but
I was always told that natural refrigerant would work above
and below the critical point on the ph chart with no detrimental
effect to the make-up of the refrigerant.

Man made refrigerants do not work above the critical point and
the closer the refrigerant is to that point the quicker it will thermally
degrade.

So in answer to your question, It might require someone with more
technical knowledge of refrigerants them self's, but I was always
lead to understand, if you run the refrigerant under the critical point
then the refrigerant would be ok..

Regards

Rob

.

Brian_UK
21-03-2013, 12:21 AM
Refrigeration Gases R-123
http://www.industrialcompressorcomponent.com/ts/zero.gif







http://1.imimg.com/data/7/I/MY-991923/17_250x250.jpg



http://www.industrialcompressorcomponent.com/ts/zero.gif
Refrigeration Gases R-123 (Dichlorotrifluoroethane)

Specification:

• Property of chloride:
• Molecular weight: 152.0
• BP, º C: 27.81
• Ice point º C: -
• Critical temperature, º C: 183.8
• Critical pressure, Mpa: 3.66
• Density of saturated liquid 25º C, (g/cm3): 1.458
• Specific heat of liquid 25º C, [KJ/(Kgº C)]: 0.985
• Solubility (water, 25º C) %: 0.39
• ODP: 0.012
• GWP: 0.026
• Critical density, g/cm3: 0.549
• Vaporization heat under BP, KJ/Kg: 171.0.