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Daytona00
16-01-2012, 01:47 AM
Hi, I have a question regarding the drainage of the refrigerated display cases of a supermarket.

I want to know how many cases are generally connected to one floor drain in a supermarket ?

From what I read, it could be from one floor drain for one case to one drain up to 4 cases. For example, I know that there would be atleast one floor drain for an island. But how much drain for 2 doors cases or a 5 doors case ?



But, for them who knows, whats the average number of cases per floor drain ? How it can be calculated approximately without seeing under the cases and without a plan who show it ?

Also, do the draining lines under the slab are generally made of PVC, iron cast ?

Is there any website with informations about it that would help me ?




Thanks very much.

750 Valve
16-01-2012, 07:04 AM
In Australia the norm is one drain per case, even on islands.

Daytona00
17-01-2012, 10:17 PM
Ok thanks.

So, for example, it could be 3 floor drains for a freezing island if it got 3 pieces of case ?


Whats the size of the floor drains generally, 3 or 4 inch ?

750 Valve
18-01-2012, 10:18 AM
usually 100mm which would be about 4 inch

taz24
18-01-2012, 05:51 PM
Hi, I have a question regarding the drainage of the refrigerated display cases of a supermarket.

I want to know how many cases are generally connected to one floor drain in a supermarket ?

From what I read, it could be from one floor drain for one case to one drain up to 4 cases. For example, I know that there would be atleast one floor drain for an island. But how much drain for 2 doors cases or a 5 doors case ?



But, for them who knows, whats the average number of cases per floor drain ? How it can be calculated approximately without seeing under the cases and without a plan who show it ?

Also, do the draining lines under the slab are generally made of PVC, iron cast ?

Is there any website with informations about it that would help me ?




Thanks very much.

In the UK the norm is one whole side of an island sharing the drain.
It can have as many as 6 maybe 8 cases attached.

I have seen drains every 2nd case and I have seen drains for 12 cases (but that is unusual).

Most, not all but most like to keep it to a maximum of 4 cases to a drain but
it all depends on the supermarket chain, the contractor and the layout of the store.

On some refits they saw and drill the floor and put sump pumps in to collect the drain water
but still different designs have different specs.

All the best

taz

.

Daytona00
19-01-2012, 01:18 AM
In the UK the norm is one whole side of an island sharing the drain.
It can have as many as 6 maybe 8 cases attached.

I have seen drains every 2nd case and I have seen drains for 12 cases (but that is unusual).

Most, not all but most like to keep it to a maximum of 4 cases to a drain but
it all depends on the supermarket chain, the contractor and the layout of the store.

On some refits they saw and drill the floor and put sump pumps in to collect the drain water
but still different designs have different specs.

All the best

taz

.

Ok considering that the pipe to the drain should be inclined by like 1 inch per 4 feets of lenght, more than 4 cases to one floor drain must be less efficient and more difficult to set up. Or it must be very small cases. Im thinking about new superkmarket that would be built. Maybe its better to have more floor drains than less to work with.

I tried to find some pictures on the web of a slab of a supermarket being built or without the cases to see the drains but didnt find many.

Or a plan showing the drains would had be good to but didnt find any.


Thank you.

taz24
19-01-2012, 08:22 AM
Ok considering that the pipe to the drain should be inclined by like 1 inch per 4 feets of lenght, more than 4 cases to one floor drain must be less efficient and more difficult to set up. Or it must be very small cases. Im thinking about new superkmarket that would be built. Maybe its better to have more floor drains than less to work with.

I tried to find some pictures on the web of a slab of a supermarket being built or without the cases to see the drains but didnt find many.

Or a plan showing the drains would had be good to but didnt find any.


Thank you.

In the UK the drains are always an after thought and the worst part of supermarket design.
Refits where they have sumps fitted are better because the drains are tailored to the cases.

When a new build is designed and the drains are well designed for the cases then they are limited
to about 4 cases per drain.

But in the UK a lot of the drains run on the floor and they have no fall at all, which results quite
often in big long slimmy eels growing in the pipes and blocking them.

So what you say about the correct fall and limited cases per drain is correct, it's just a shame
supermarkets dont give drains more thought in the UK.

All the best

taz

.

cold.man
20-01-2012, 02:56 PM
water leaks are a big problem in supermarkets due to the drain set up as previously mentioned. the trouble is the issue constantly gets ignored by the supermarket chains.
like previously mentioned its an after thought on installation of a new store, and when the stores have refits obviously they limit the down time as much as possible so the drain issues are brushed under the carpet.
i run an installation in Australia once in an IGA supermarket and utilized the underground car park area.
each drain of each case went staight through the floor or near as damn it and the main drains where accessible in the car park area.
clearing the drains was designed to be easy and time onsite for water leaks was designed to be cut down dramatically.
also the plant room was in the under croft car park area and the pipework was designed the same way, pipework was more accessible for leak testing etc.
obviously when i was working in OZ in 2006 for this installation i didn't see the benefits from this design for long because i left in 2010, but i used my knowledge as a service engineer when it was being installed and made it as service friendly as possible.
obviously you don't always have sites you can utilize areas such as under croft areas but on supermarkets i work on as a service engineer in the UK i have never seen this done where this would be possible.
you would think some of these project engineers would just sit back and think outside of the box for a while and think of the serviceability of the installation a little more.

750 Valve
21-01-2012, 06:23 AM
As Coldman mentioned we use the space under a suspended slab (be it a carpark or even a retail level) for drainage plumbing. Also in front of every case's drain is a drain access point for jetting drains if necessary. We rarely have floor drainage issues but they do happen and are easily rectified by the plumbers.

supercool
23-01-2012, 08:23 PM
Hi there, i work in the uk on supermarkets. As the coments above, the dranage in our supermarkets are very poor. There is no thought put into them at all. I have just left a brand new build, you can not even reach half the drains let alone clear them once they are blocked!
Not to mention that half the case transducers are behind bulkheads with no access to them! but it does look nice!

cold.man
23-01-2012, 09:44 PM
commonsense WHATS THAT ????? BUT IT LOOKS NICE ANYWAY.

These supermarkets should take time out to speak to a handful of service engineers, but we are the bottom of the food chain we no fu!!!!all.

Its like some of these places i have seen over the years lets put an AHU in the ceiling and plaster board over it with no access if it breaks down we will rip the ceiling down to replace its because thats cost effective BUT IT LOOKS NICE !!!! BIIIIZZZZZZAAAARRREEEEE.

this just strengthens the FACT intelligence = no commonsense.