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harmoniac
13-11-2010, 06:12 PM
Hi,

Anyone familiar with aDsorption Chiller?

I have a customer requesting a chiller that utilize their waste heat gas from 2MW gas generator, their first option was using absorption chiller, however due to unstable gas supply which led to power plunge, which might led to crystallization of lithium bromide.

While their second option was to use aDsorption chiller, however there wasn't enough information about the product and company who produce it.

I read in some articles that currently there are 4 manufacturers of adsorption chiller:
a. HIJC
b. Mayekawa
c. GBU
d. ShuangLiang

Does anyone has any experience in using adsorption chiller?

Is there any problem using adsorption?

Out of that 4 manufacturer, which one is the best?
Anyone know about HIJC, as according to their website that they are US based company, however they don't have physical office (only PO Box and phone number).

Thank you.

Luke.G
18-11-2010, 08:23 PM
yeah due to the unstable condition of the constant gas, i think there would be a issue with the crystaliszation of the lithrium bromide.
Also i know sayno/carrier to absorption chillers aswell,
you do know you would also need sometime like a dry cooler or cooling tower for absorption cycle to work aswell?

Quality
18-11-2010, 08:33 PM
Try Cooltec in the USA

HAROLDMYCOM
23-12-2010, 11:23 PM
Hi Harmonics, Mayekawa showed their new generation Zero lite adsorption chillers called Adref-noa at last Chillventa and it showed great intrest. if your intrested in such machines I recommend you take contact with a local Mayekawa office or the office in Canada, Japan or Belgium.

Some basic information: Adsorption chiller Adref-Noa can produce 41℉~59℉ chilled water from 140℉~176℉ hot waste water. This machine is the ultimate act to reduce CO2 emissions. Expand the possibility of using renewable and unsed energy. Adref-Noa uses the water as its refrigerant and uses very little electricity. A system with a COP equalling 10 is in your reach.

If you like some more information before taking contact I recommend the webiste of Mayekawa canada

Good luck in your search harold

Magoo
24-12-2010, 12:17 AM
Carrier used to supply them decades ago.

MikeHolm
24-12-2010, 03:17 AM
HIJC is an American licencee and importer in Texas. The actual product is Japanese. I almost put a 25 ton unit in 2006. We did all the engineering but the government financing fell through. The system was to have as a primary heat source, 300 vacuum tube panels from Schott in Germany and was to switch to modulating boilers when there was not enough solar.

The main reason for using adsorption technology was that, adsorption chillers can take any temperature given to it and the only thing affected is the COP. In Absorption units such as the Yazaki the refrigerant must be kept in a much narrower temp range or it can chrystalize. I haven't thought about it for awhile so excuse my lack of details, i was focusing on the solar side anyway.

The amount of sacrificial power needed is limited to circ pumps which is good but the the equipment is considerably more expensive than absorption units.

I would definately use it if the situation called for it but the decision depends on the waste heat temp and availability.

harmoniac
12-01-2011, 09:11 AM
Thanks guys.

I talked to Mayekawa.

Zeolite might give a better performance with lower heat source inlet temperature (100% with only 65C, however stable at 100% with the increase of heat source even at 90C), on the other hand, silica gel would only gain 65% performance with 65C inlet temperature, however, when the inlet temperature reached 90C, the performance will be increased to 140%.

Mike, if I want to purchase this nishiyodo adsorption chiller, do you know whether I can directly go to japanese company or I have to buy it from HIJC?

Thanks.

MikeHolm
12-01-2011, 12:14 PM
I will ask my old partner who was dealing with HIJC but I believe they only had the rights for North America so I would approach the Japanese, given your location.

Although the efficiency of the adsorption machine is not as good as, for example, a double effect chiller, the stability and lack of sacrificial power needed trumped everything else and to determine the true efficiency you must factor in all the electrical consumption.

It has been 4 years since we were looking at this so there has been some advances elsewhere. I will try to find an engineering paper which has most of the details (if I can dig through the big mess in my office) and post it.

MikeHolm
12-01-2011, 12:26 PM
I would also be wary of any chiller company which purports to have a high performance at 65-80C. There are a few companies in Europe, especially, who are focusing on 4-10kw machines for residential and small commercial applications and the results are still demonstrating instability at these temps. You will have the best impact if you can provide 100C+. We know that vacuum solar collectors, which demonstrate higher efficiency at 100C+ than European flat collectors (meant for northern latitudes) but the maintenance and failures of vacuum technology have driven the manufacturers to try to work with lower temps in an attempt to have a greater longevity. 65-80C performance has, in my experience, not been proven in the long term yet.

zeotrope
08-04-2011, 08:44 PM
Hi, have a look at the Yazaki website too, these machines seem to work nice,
they provide good Information about required temperatures. I know one setup
that works well with solar power and one with waste heat.(Solar feed not in
germany)

coldwine
28-05-2011, 08:59 AM
A little late but...
We supplied and installed the first Nishiyodo ADsorption chiller here in US at a winery in Napa Valley about 8-9 years ago.
There are now several options for mfgs. of ADsorption chillers using either zeolite or silica gel adsorbent. These range from 5 tons to 400 tons currently and use hot water from 65 C to 90 C. Yes, zeolite best for lower temp. hot water and silica gel better for higher temp hot water input. It is best to not go over 90C input to current adsorption chiller technology or a condition occurs inside chambers that can damage adsorbent bed material, so do not use 100C for adsorption chillers. Future developments will include a steam fired ADsorption chiller and exhaust heat fired ADsorption chiller, but for now only hot water fired.

If anyone needs any further information about ADsorption chillers let me know...

kennedyjp
22-08-2011, 06:18 PM
A little late but...
We supplied and installed the first Nishiyodo ADsorption chiller here in US at a winery in Napa Valley about 8-9 years ago.
There are now several options for mfgs. of ADsorption chillers using either zeolite or silica gel adsorbent. These range from 5 tons to 400 tons currently and use hot water from 65 C to 90 C. Yes, zeolite best for lower temp. hot water and silica gel better for higher temp hot water input. It is best to not go over 90C input to current adsorption chiller technology or a condition occurs inside chambers that can damage adsorbent bed material, so do not use 100C for adsorption chillers. Future developments will include a steam fired ADsorption chiller and exhaust heat fired ADsorption chiller, but for now only hot water fired.

If anyone needs any further information about ADsorption chillers let me know...

Could you give us some cost figures?

Egle76
23-08-2011, 07:38 AM
A little late but...
We supplied and installed the first Nishiyodo ADsorption chiller here in US at a winery in Napa Valley about 8-9 years ago.
There are now several options for mfgs. of ADsorption chillers using either zeolite or silica gel adsorbent. These range from 5 tons to 400 tons currently and use hot water from 65 C to 90 C. Yes, zeolite best for lower temp. hot water and silica gel better for higher temp hot water input. It is best to not go over 90C input to current adsorption chiller technology or a condition occurs inside chambers that can damage adsorbent bed material, so do not use 100C for adsorption chillers. Future developments will include a steam fired ADsorption chiller and exhaust heat fired ADsorption chiller, but for now only hot water fired.

If anyone needs any further information about ADsorption chillers let me know...


Hi,I would implement a system in a Solar cooling plant in a climate very warm and humid...so,using solar panels sure we can go over 100C. Can we have any problem?What is the connection between performance and temperature of inlet hot water?Please,could you add some information about cost?thank you,Mark.

shree
18-11-2011, 10:30 AM
Hi, i was thinking to use hot process condensate at 90C (somewhat dirty) to recover heat and produce chilling effect needed for our factory processes. I read all above discussion, but still woder about the advantages of relatively new Adsorption chiller over well developed absorption chiller. What are those rather than government subsidies in few countries. Could anyone help?
Thanks in advance!

MikeHolm
18-11-2011, 12:09 PM
One of the biggest reasons for going absorption over adsorption is the equipment cost. People who use waste heat as will look at that factor but if solar is the motive force, running power is a bigger consideration and over the long term adsorption might be better. Different motivation.