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Daddy Cool
28-12-2004, 09:31 PM
This is honestly a question on behalf of a friend!

Daikin 410a, in the tech books they say use ether oil. my friend tried at numerous trade counter to purchase some and was told, no it's ester oil he wanted. i was at the time working for a Daikin distributor and he asked me. i agreed it was Ether oil and asked our technical who said it must be the same stuff! not convinced i called Daikin Belgium who said, no Ether and Ester and different and you must use Ether, they could provide it vast cost (about 85 per litre)

has anyone else come across this? is their much difference? and does anyone else stock it apart from Daikin? finally is this oil peculiar to Daikin or do others use it?

chemi-cool
29-12-2004, 05:29 AM
hi dad.

Whatever Diakin say, R410A works with POE (ester oil)

I would guess that the word Ether, is only a spelling mistake.
The Japanese and Chinese do it all the time ;)

Chemi :)

Daddy Cool
31-12-2004, 04:11 PM
i'm sure you are right, maybe it's just the Daikin Chemical division creating some more margin on their products by insisting you use their special oil. Daikin technical in Belgium said it was better at reducing moisture in the system, but i don't see why that should be a concern for any decent engineer having followed the rules, only the monkeys that never pull a vacuum apart from when they are syphoning diesel out of your tank! :D

chemi-cool
31-12-2004, 04:59 PM
Hi Daddy cool.

Maybe Peter can check it as he lives near the factory in Belgium.
I'm sure he doesn't have anything better to do tomorrow :D

Have a happy New Year.

Chemi :)

rbartlett
31-12-2004, 06:17 PM
i'm sure you are right, maybe it's just the Daikin Chemical division creating some more margin on their products by insisting you use their special oil. Daikin technical in Belgium said it was better at reducing moisture in the system, but i don't see why that should be a concern for any decent engineer having followed the rules, only the monkeys that never pull a vacuum apart from when they are syphoning diesel out of your tank! :D



but you must remember that the ONLY reason the japanese started saying that you must vacuum the pipework was when purging became illegal.....

cheers

richard

Peter_1
31-12-2004, 10:56 PM
Hi Daddy cool.

Maybe Peter can check it as he lives near the factory in Belgium.
I'm sure he doesn't have anything better to do tomorrow :D

Have a happy New Year.

Chemi :)

First of all, a happy Newyear to you all and my biggest wish for the moment is that we may all be saved for disasters like happened in Asia. May al those peoples over there find somehow the power/strength to survive this in some way.
It's horrible.

As you see Chemi, I'm in front of my PC, my wife sitting besides me watching a movie "The age of Innocence", 1 hour before the Newyear.
As you know, Daikin is not my biggest friend anymore but I will ask it Monday, the first working day.

Ross
29-04-2006, 02:33 PM
Hi guys.

I know this forum started a long time ago but I am new to the site & after browsing saw this thread & would like to clarify the question. Daikin is in fact using a synthetic oil called Ether in there R407C & R410A system. It is a oil that has been made & patented by Daikin Chemical Division therefore no other manufacturer uses it. Although Ether oil is more hydroscopic than mineral & ester oil the advantage it has is that the oil will not degrade if moisture enters the system. Because there has been no degradation the oil & does not turn acidic & eventually cause burnouts of the compressor windings. Because of this no burnout dryers are required when a compressor change is carried out. To date Daikin has seen very few electrical compressor failures since the introduction of Ether oils into there systems. I hope this clarifies you question.

NoNickName
29-04-2006, 03:08 PM
Polyether oil is produced, among the others, by

Euro Chemie Products Limited
RL 20, Industrial Estate
Ricasoli,
Malta CSP 11
# Tel : 356-800-519 / 356-824-300
# Fax : 356-800-587