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BondingBilll
21-02-2009, 03:21 PM
Hello,
Please could any of you help me, I am having problems with the above unit tripping the 30mA RCD as soon as the power is switched on. The unit is brand new and this happened on the initial start up. I have never wired any of these units up before. Does the power unit have a high earth current leakage? :(

Cheers and thanks for any help
BondingBill

Brian_UK
21-02-2009, 06:20 PM
In general air conditioning systems are not included on circuits fed by RCDs.

We've had discussions on this before, I'll have a search around for you.

[edit] Have a look here, post 11.

http://www.refrigeration-engineer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12125&highlight=tripping+power

BondingBilll
21-02-2009, 09:23 PM
Many thanks Brian for your help, the only problem is that this unit has been fitted on a camping park (cabins) and has to be protected by a 30mA RCD by IEE regs. The heat pump was fitted without my knowledge, otherwise I would of advised the customer against buying it, but as he has now fitted it I have to try and find away to get it working. Maybe I can wire a seperate 100mA RCD just for the unit. Do you know of anyone who's had any success fitting an 100mA RCD on this unit
Thanks again, :) I will let you know how I get on.

Cheers Bondingbilll

Slatts
22-02-2009, 12:02 AM
This might be a silly question BondingBil, but what's the full load amps on the A/C and what's the amp rating on the RCD?
You're not just overloading the breaker are you?

Electrocoolman
22-02-2009, 01:19 AM
Obvious, but have you checked the unit is wired correctly? No crossed wires, etc.

Out of intrest, "Why would you have advised against buying it" ?

These units are NOT meant to be self install by the way!

BondingBilll
22-02-2009, 12:57 PM
hi , max load 12 amps , mcb 20 , rcd rated at 45 amps with a 30m mA trip.
It is the rcd that is tripping not the mcb. I think it is something to do with the filters in the power supply unit in the heat pump , leaking it down to earth, cheers

BondingBilll
22-02-2009, 01:25 PM
hi, this job is for the heating engineer that i do contract work for, he has fitted it in his holiday lodge which is controlled by IEE camping park regulations i;e has to be protected by a 30mA RCD and total load for the lodge is 20amps no more and this is the reason why I would have recomended him not to buy it. His work force have been trained on heat pumps and this was the first one he had fitted and he was trying this one out for his own purpose. He had an independent refrigeration engineer on site to commission it.
cheers

nike123
22-02-2009, 02:22 PM
hi, this job is for the heating engineer that i do contract work for, he has fitted it in his holiday lodge which is controlled by IEE camping park regulations i;e has to be protected by a 30mA RCD and total load for the lodge is 20amps no more and this is the reason why I would have recomended him not to buy it. His work force have been trained on heat pumps and this was the first one he had fitted and he was trying this one out for his own purpose. He had an independent refrigeration engineer on site to commission it.
cheers


There are special RCD-s made for that purpose. They are called B type (It exsist 3 types:A,B and AC). Manufacturer is ABB. Model# is F200 B
]http://hvacity.danfoss.com/pdf_files/rcd.pdf

THE WOMBAT
22-02-2009, 07:13 PM
If there is already a fridge running on the power network this will bring the current leakage very close to tripping point,

A new unit sould run within the 30ma limit, older units the insulation started to break down in the comp and the oil isn't resisting the path of current flow as it did new.!

BondingBilll
22-02-2009, 10:03 PM
HI , yes there is a fridge on the network, I will be calling back to this job on wednesday , I will test the complete installation and try it with all other appliances disconnected,
thanks for your help B/B

Slatts
23-02-2009, 10:15 AM
Hi BondingBill, are you saying that everything in the cabin goes through the same RCD?

back2space
26-02-2009, 06:01 AM
if the system is inverter it shouldnt be tripping out as soon as its running even if there is a fridge running.

INverters dont draw full current at start up they wind up slowly.

If its a fixed speed unit then yes it will run at full possibly a little more to get it going.

Have you actually switched the unit onto operation when it trips or just at the mains?

Brian_UK
26-02-2009, 11:53 PM
if the system is inverter it shouldnt be tripping out as soon as its running even if there is a fridge running.

INverters dont draw full current at start up they wind up slowly.

If its a fixed speed unit then yes it will run at full possibly a little more to get it going.

Have you actually switched the unit onto operation when it trips or just at the mains?It is the RCD that is tripping, not the overload.

BondingBilll
06-03-2009, 11:47 AM
sorry for the late reply. NO it isnt the overload its the 30ma local rcd and also the 300ma upstream rcd that is also tripping. I have tested insulation to earth on the unit and i get a very low reading, it must be a faulty unit. but up till now i can not convince the service people it is faulty. im now waiting for their reply on monday.

p.s the unit is situated 120 miles away in the lake district.

THanks for your help

bonding bill