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lm2008
21-08-2008, 04:30 PM
Hi all,

New to the site - very informative.

I'm looking to purchase a single room a/c system, I've had a site survey done and am looking at a Daikin system :)

The indoor unit is a FTXS35DW and the outdoor unit is an RXS35.

I'm getting quotes for around £1200 + VAT at 5%, is this about right? I am based in the Midlands if anyone has any recommendations please let me know!

Thanks

The Viking
21-08-2008, 05:37 PM
Hard to say if the "price is right" when we don't know anything about the install.

Have a look at my website for some advice of what to look for when buying A/C units.
(No, I do not push anything, it's pure free info, call it public service)

The MG Pony
21-08-2008, 07:11 PM
What do you want? Crap or quality?

You pay for what you get and the premium comes at a price!

Better way to put it your asking us if you got a fair price?

Prince Vaillant
21-08-2008, 07:38 PM
Get another couple of quotes.

Argus
21-08-2008, 07:57 PM
.

The split AC market in the UK is currently flooded with systems made in the Far East and sold at very cheap prices. Some of these are also being sold by other companies on a ‘badged’ basis.
This site has numerous posts on the alleged lack of quality in these areas that are posted over the years. Many of these units will lack the back-up support of an established manufacturer, so I’ll leave that decision to you.

One further thing to ask is if the system in question qualifies for Enhanced Capital Allowances (ECAs). This means that if you are a business paying corporation tax and in profit in the year of purchase, you can claim the equivalent of the depreciation on the equipment that would be allowed over 10 years back in the in the first year.
This is not free money, but as a rule of thumb, this could work out at about 30% of the purchase cost and you accountant should be able to tell you about it.

You won’t qualify for the tax break if you are a private individual or a not-for profit organisation, but you can use the Government’s ECA listing as a benchmark of energy efficiency of the unit that you select.

They are listed by technology type, manufacturer, then model number.

You can read about it here http://www.eca.gov.uk/etl/default.htm

.

superswill
21-08-2008, 10:02 PM
Hi all,

New to the site - very informative.

I'm looking to purchase a single room a/c system, I've had a site survey done and am looking at a Daikin system :)

The indoor unit is a FTXS35DW and the outdoor unit is an RXS35.

I'm getting quotes for around £1200 + VAT at 5%, is this about right? I am based in the Midlands if anyone has any recommendations please let me know!

Thanks

my ten pence worth,where is the ac system going? price is depended on so many factors,like already said the make of system but then there is the labour involved with a nature of the install,is it back to back? will pipes/cables need running in lofts ect how long is the run ect will any holes needed cutting into brick work? will a sub contractor be needed to do this?

lm2008
27-08-2008, 10:01 AM
Thanks all for the replies.

The power cables can be run directly from the fuse box up into the loft and then down into the master bedroom.

The indoor unit would go onto the bedroom wall and the outdoor unit will be on the other side of that wall; ie it is an outside wall and minimal piping would be required.

I definitly want quality, not crap!

I must say however I have found local companies to be quite unreliable, twice i rang one company in Birmingham leaving my details expecting a call back for a quote and they never rang me... unbelievable!

Slim R410a
27-08-2008, 11:12 AM
If your price includes all mains electrical work, then yes that is a really good price.
Note your mains supply from the consumer will run to the outdoor unit, the indoor unit will then take its supply from here via the interconecting cable. You will require a 10amp mcb for that system.
I did similar install with an FTXS25D not long ago for £1,100 plus VAT@5%.
Hope this helps:)

multisync
27-08-2008, 04:59 PM
Wiring from a consumer unit evokes Part P regulations and must by law have a ticket issued or the local council must inspect.
Best bet would be either a plugtop or a 13a fused spur. (but not from a Kitchen)

Power to outdoor is notifiable either way...

Multisync
London

The Viking
28-08-2008, 05:12 PM
Wiring from a consumer unit evokes Part P regulations and must by law have a ticket issued or the local council must inspect.
Best bet would be either a plugtop or a 13a fused spur. (but not from a Kitchen)

Power to outdoor is notifiable either way...

Multisync
London


?????
:eek:
:rolleyes:

So, first the LAW states that you must follow part P and get the right paperwork from the installer, OK I'm with you this far but then the LAW would allow you to feed a fixed installation from a plug/socket?? No, you got me there I'm afraid, can't see it...

The MG Pony
28-08-2008, 06:38 PM
?????
:eek:
:rolleyes:

So, first the LAW states that you must follow part P and get the right paperwork from the installer, OK I'm with you this far but then the LAW would allow you to feed a fixed installation from a plug/socket?? No, you got me there I'm afraid, can't see it...

think thats good? Here it is illegal to vent R-134a with lose of liscance and a 25,000 dollar fine, yet they sell it in cans as an air duster for electronics!

Air duster = R-134a
.................R-152a

lm2008
07-09-2008, 11:45 AM
It's in... thanks for the replies all. What a stunning piece of kit. The system is so quiet you can barely hear it on night mode.

Indoor unit is also a lot smaller than I expected.

Glad I went Daikin.

multisync
07-09-2008, 01:54 PM
?????
:eek:
:rolleyes:

So, first the LAW states that you must follow part P and get the right paperwork from the installer, OK I'm with you this far but then the LAW would allow you to feed a fixed installation from a plug/socket?? No, you got me there I'm afraid, can't see it...

General notes and guidance


H, The installation of fixed equipment is within the scope of Part P even when the final connection is by a 13a plugtop and socket.However work is notifiable only if involves fixed wiring and and the installation of a new circuit or the extension of a circuit in a kitchen or special location or associated with a special installation.

Every 17th qualified electrician I have spoken too agrees that there would be no ramifications if wired to a 13a fuse spur or 13a plugtop provided the necessary Regs are adhered too

Multisync
london

eggs
07-09-2008, 02:28 PM
My interpritation of Part P for conseratories tells me. If i run a new circuit to power an A/C system it is notifiable.
If you extend or modify an existing circuit, ie add a switched fused spur your ok.

What i tend to do if the customer is squealing on the price, is get a disclaimer signed stating that the 13a plugtop i use is for commissioning purposes only.
Whether they get or sparky in or just replace the 13a plug when i'm gone is none of my business.
As long as i'm happy i'm not leaving behind a fire hazard, it's up to them.

eggs

Argus
07-09-2008, 04:48 PM
.


Whilst some of you are mentioning the UK law and Part P of the UK Building Regulations, what the UK law also states is that if the appliance is supplied with a power cord (i.e. from the indoor unit) AND is capable of being powered from a UK type 13 A domestic socket,(i.e. an inverter split system), then the supplier MUST BY LAW supply it for sale an approved plug.

There are exclusions in le the law that allow appliances with a fixed power lead to be supplied from a fixed circuit (i.e. a spur or switched spur or a similar switched supply and NOT a 13 amp plug).

Many such Japanese split- type systems fall into this category and to overcome any ambiguities, many of the manufacturers state that it must be powered from a fixed supply and carry a note top this effect in the fitting instructions..

The law? It is SI No. 1768 / 1994 - CONSUMER PROTECTION
- The Plugs and Sockets etc. (Safety) Regulations 1994

Here it is: http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si1994/Uksi_19941768_en_1.htm

In any split system, the interconnecting wiring must be carried out by a competent person within the description in the regulations, so you’re back into the realm of Part P.




.

lm2008
10-10-2008, 01:32 PM
After reading the instructions for the installed unit, I have noticed that in heating mode it is recommended to be used only when the outdoor temperature is above 15 degrees celcius.

Is this standard for heat pumps, I know they pump heat from outside but was hoping to use the unit on heat mode in the winter, but I certainly don't want to damage it!

nike123
10-10-2008, 06:09 PM
After reading the instructions for the installed unit, I have noticed that in heating mode it is recommended to be used only when the outdoor temperature is above 15 degrees celcius.



You mean below 15°C?

lm2008
11-10-2008, 10:07 AM
You mean below 15°C?

Sorry, checked again its -15c to +15c.

So the unit can transfer heat from outside to in, even when its well below freezing outside, wow..

nike123
11-10-2008, 11:03 AM
Sorry, checked again its -15c to +15c.

So the unit can transfer heat from outside to in, even when its well below freezing outside, wow..

Yes, but probably with 1/2 of maximum capacity when outdoor is -15°C!
Something like this:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3031/2931394614_6a8d8112c2_o_d.jpg