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dgrotti
04-07-2003, 08:11 PM
Hi everyone.

I'm down here in Brazil and I would like to know what substance is generaly used when you need to clean up the system. E.g. Changing r-12 to R-134a.

I would appreciate if you guys gave me the trade name of that product.

Thanks,

Dgrotti

Latte
04-07-2003, 09:12 PM
Normally you dont need to flush the system out. to be honest i dont know if there is anything available to do that, usually you just need to change the oil & drier & give it a good vac out. On larger systems you can fit a clean-up filter if there is contamination but i am fairly sure theres none available for small domestic applicaions
What sort of application is it that you are looking to change over.
If you can be a bit more specific, then i am sure you will get lots of posts from people who have done the same job

Karl Hofmann
04-07-2003, 09:29 PM
For automotive systems I use solvent based brake parts cleaner to flush out the mineral oil, works well, evaporates quickly and leaves no residue. If its not automotive why not use R413a instead of R134a as it carries the mineral oil (So its sales blurb states) and so should work as a straight drop in.

dgrotti
04-07-2003, 10:19 PM
Actually here in Brazil when we have a compressor burn-out we use HCFC 141b to flush the system out. I'd like to know if its really necessary to use it, and if it is is there any other options instead of HCFC 141b.

Thanks again,

Dgrotti

condenseddave
05-07-2003, 10:32 AM
Polyolester oils flush the crud out rather nicely.

Prof Sporlan
07-07-2003, 03:23 AM
Flushing refrigeration systems out with either CFCs or HCFCs, e.g., R-11 or R-141b, is a bit passe in the ozone friendly world which we live in. Current general practice is to get rid of as much refrigeration oil as possible, and to use filter-driers to finish cleaning up the system.

Using solvents such as R-11 and R-141b, however, are effective in cleaning up systems... :)

dgrotti
08-07-2003, 12:30 PM
I agree that those solvents aren't the most environment friendly options, but flushing the system with polyolester oil is way too expensive here in Brazil due to its cost.

If anybody has a less expensive option or a substitute to R-11 and R-141b please let me know.

Thanks again for all posts..

DGROTTI

condenseddave
08-07-2003, 06:36 PM
Well, you're changing to 134a, so, you're gonna need to change the POE oil two or three times anyway. Unless you're planning on attempting to use another type of oil...

Latte
06-10-2003, 06:56 PM
Hello Karl,
Have you ever tried brake cleaner on fridges with capilary tubes.
Just seeing if there is anything extra you can use to help clean them out when you have a compressor burnout on R134a

DaBit
07-10-2003, 09:46 AM
For metallic debris (scale) and copper lines, nothing beats (diluted!) sulphuric acid. For organic debris, acetone works very well.

Be sure to flush the sulphuric acid out entirely before trying any organic solvent! Also, do NOT use sulphuric acid when there is aluminium present.

Karl Hofmann
07-10-2003, 04:36 PM
Rdocwra,

I have never used it on a capilliary, I see no reason why it shouldn't work, but I did use it a few months ago when I re used the pipe work from a burned out Hitachi when installing a new Mitsubishi cassette to run on 407c. I fired about two gallons through the pipe work at 100psi from the inside out (Make sure that there is a means to capture the residue, Brake cleaner dissolves tarmac :D )
I then passed plenty of clean dry compressed air through, followed up by plenty of OFN and a good Vacuum

l3astardd
09-02-2010, 04:08 AM
im replacing a compressor that used to run r22 with an r404a, what should i clean it with?

lowcool
09-02-2010, 04:37 AM
isnt brake fluid water based

jcook1982
10-02-2010, 02:50 PM
I've heard of using "Quick Flush" and then follow up with a flush of R406A. I guess the "Quick Flush" is safe and does not need to be in an enclosed system so you can shoot it in one end of the system and out the other into a bucket so you can see what is coming out.

Has anyone ever used "Quick Flush"?
I've used R406A with our Van Steemburgh System.

indian
12-02-2010, 07:57 PM
In the UK we have a chemical CF 20 for cleaning systems, you pump the liquid through the system, recover it and let the pipes drain leaving as little as possible in the system ie NONE. We normally let it flush with gravity then blow the pipe work out with OFN and then vac the system and re charge. Works okay on smaller systems only thing is big systems a bit of a problem especially when pipe work is not flat and level (which we all know it hardly ever is or can be). In that case we normally replace full condensing unit break system at expansion valve and again blow through with plenty high pressure OFN doing the Suction and liquid lines seperately, then the evap on its own. I normally try and hold a plug over the open end let the pressure build up and release pressure sharply to spit out any oil in the pipework.

Toosh
12-02-2010, 08:56 PM
I've heard of using "Quick Flush" and then follow up with a flush of R406A. I guess the "Quick Flush" is safe and does not need to be in an enclosed system so you can shoot it in one end of the system and out the other into a bucket so you can see what is coming out.

Has anyone ever used "Quick Flush"?
I've used R406A with our Van Steemburgh System.


Here is one in the States and is recommended for refrigeration its the same as Indian mentioned

http://www.beverageonline.com/product.mvc/ComStar-CF-20-System-Cleaner-Oil-Transfer-Pum-0001?VNETCOOKIE=NO

Norm

hannesvr
03-03-2010, 11:01 AM
Hi everyone.

I'm down here in Brazil and I would like to know what substance is generaly used when you need to clean up the system. E.g. Changing r-12 to R-134a.

I would appreciate if you guys gave me the trade name of that product.

Thanks,

Dgrotti
Hi i am from south africa i have cleaned out several systems smal or large such as york chillers up to 3000tons. use fo 128 electrical cleaner. disolves and cleans like a dream. use nitrogen to force thru. cheers hannes