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cre8waves
08-03-2008, 02:47 AM
I know its a refrigeration web sight ,but i think most of us do some gas heating being service tech's . :D

Brian_UK
09-03-2008, 01:53 AM
Yes we do here in the UK also but this forum is called Refrigeration-Engineer so the addition of a Boilers or Heating section would be outside the remit of the site.

Grizzly
09-03-2008, 12:46 PM
Well said Brian.
I thought it but was reluctant to say so.
Because I did not want to appear rude.

But there you go a moderator has said it for us ..Thanks
Grizzly

Brian_UK
09-03-2008, 07:36 PM
I think there is a difference in usage on the two sides of the Ocean.

Here in the UK we tend to have wet heating systems and separate air cooling.

In the States I believe that they have blown air 'furnaces' with the addition of an 'A'-coil on top for the cooling function. So, they are probably more used to doing both principles at once.

However..... this is RE.

US Iceman
09-03-2008, 09:39 PM
Look at how much fun we have with plain refrigeration systems without adding heating and or boilers to the mix.:eek:

I think it is enough to just leave it with refrigeration...;)

nh3wizard
10-03-2008, 07:25 PM
Sometimes at the bigger food processing plants the "Refrigeration Engineer" is required to maintain the sites boiler sytem and air systems

Brian_UK
11-03-2008, 01:34 AM
I have no problem with that.

I service air conditioning and also gas fired heating plant and any ventilation systems as required.

However I do not try and fire the boiler on refrigerant gas although it might work with the hydrocarbons ;)

andy c
11-03-2008, 10:11 PM
Interesting, I have a site with Robur gas chillers, which are a pain in the @rs cos I dont have the qualifications to work on the gas side, although I am competent enough through previous years when being registered wasn't so much an issue. Nowadays I have to get a subby in with his corgi. How frustrating. :mad::mad::mad:, However, I would find a boilers forum quite useful. Andy C.

Brian_UK
12-03-2008, 01:23 AM
Andy, that was why I first obtained my CORGI ticket so that the throbbing Roburs could be serviced by one man.

edit: Just did a service for 'boiler forum' and came up with one which shows, like most do, the number of posts under each heading.

Under "Air Conditioning" it had never, aaah, what a shame :)

I think that it is difficult to quantify what would be needed here as most of us would think of a CORGI guy as 'doing heating boilers' etc where as we might just need 'burner' operation help.

Within the UK though we come back to the Competent Person through CORGI and I, as one, would be wary of offering advice about gas fired equipment. We are quick enough to decry non-fridgies who want to bypass an 'expert' so some care is needed before someone cries wolf.

andy c
12-03-2008, 01:56 AM
I agree with you Brian, about the not wanting to give advice to non registered engineers, it could be a danger / H&S issue, but the controls side of it could be useful. I myself hope soon to be doing a Heating and Corgi course. I tend to check out all the controls side of it myself, and just leave the likes of burner maintenance etc to the heating contractor. Most burner faults I experience tend to be with the controls and ignition. Regards, Andy C.

Brian_UK
12-03-2008, 02:07 AM
Very true Andy, the problem/danger (strong words but you know what I mean) is that you may cure a control problem but be unaware of an underlying gas problem, hence CORGI, slapped wrists and all that.

Mind you, it's another call-out pain being on gas too. Had one tonight, five minutes from home and a call to a residential home 55 miles away. Turns out to be a ****y thermocouple that had been fitted this morning by another techie. That's the second dodgey thermocouple I've had this month; must all be made on Fridays I reckon.

cre8waves
15-03-2008, 04:05 AM
Well being in the midwest states and working on commerical boilers up to 800 bhp . Trying to find a sight that i can discuss power burners and combustion testing . Have many buildings that have single pipe systems . Is it true that over in the UK that heating valves fail close ?

Grizzly
15-03-2008, 11:39 AM
Is it true that over in the UK that heating valves fail close ?

Can't blame a bloke for trying eh!

Do they have Heating Valves on Refrigeration equipment?
Or are you talking Heat Pump??
Grizzly

cre8waves
15-03-2008, 04:47 PM
Hey mates , I was referring to hot water systems that use 2 or 3 way valves . We in the states have buildings that have pneumatics as the control signal that operate valves that are normally open .meaning that it takes air pressure to close .

Grizzly
15-03-2008, 05:39 PM
Hey mates , I was referring to hot water systems that use 2 or 3 way valves . We in the states have buildings that have pneumatics as the control signal that operate valves that are normally open .meaning that it takes air pressure to close .


AH! So that will be the Hot Water System and not the REFRIGERATION Plant then!

Cre8waves is an apt name then!
Grizzly

Brian_UK
16-03-2008, 01:27 AM
Hey mates , I was referring to hot water systems that use 2 or 3 way valves . We in the states have buildings that have pneumatics as the control signal that operate valves that are normally open .meaning that it takes air pressure to close .I believe that there are very few pneumatic systems still working in the UK now, mostly electric - so power fail, valve stays where it is.

nike123
17-03-2008, 02:33 PM
Hey mates , I was referring to hot water systems that use 2 or 3 way valves . We in the states have buildings that have pneumatics as the control signal that operate valves that are normally open .meaning that it takes air pressure to close .
Did you checked HvacProTech forum:
http://hvacprotech.forumwise.com/
they have lot of discussion about boilers and they are US oriented.