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Egan Technical
08-02-2008, 01:01 AM
Hi, I'm new to RE. it's great.
I looking for a step by step procedure for replacing a compressor on a standard 134a FF. Any web sites, references or best of all, experience based info. Any good tips/ suggestions - Thanks

chillin out
08-02-2008, 01:13 AM
Why do you want to know?

Are you DIY and going to learn, or are you trying to train yourself to become a fridgy?

Chillin:):)

Egan Technical
09-02-2008, 01:16 AM
Hi Chillin,
I have a technical services business here in good old Ireland. I service most technical things including fridges. I am a qualified engineer, and I have also completed a C&G refrigeration cert in the UK. While I have a fairly good understanding on the basics, and I often recharge domestic fridges and small commercial units, I have never actually changed a compressor. I would like to improve my technical competence. Best regards

Brian_UK
09-02-2008, 01:27 AM
OK, so you'll need..

Recovery machine
Recovery cyclinder
OFN
Brazing kit
Vacuum pump and gauge.

Recover refrigerant from FF, sample oil to establish contamination level assuming that the compressor has failed.

Remove compressor.

Be prepared to replace the filter/drier and possibly the capillary lines as they might be blocked.

Check electrical components serving the compressor, may need new start relay and capacitors.


Install new compressor, pressure test, evacuate and recharge.

Now also consider the cost involved against the cost of a new replacement FF with it's own new warranty.

Are you prepared to warranty the repair considering what crap could be inside the system after a compressor failure?

taz24
09-02-2008, 12:20 PM
OK, so you'll need..

Recovery machine
Recovery cyclinder
OFN
Brazing kit
Vacuum pump and gauge.

Recover refrigerant from FF, sample oil to establish contamination level assuming that the compressor has failed.

Remove compressor.

Be prepared to replace the filter/drier and possibly the capillary lines as they might be blocked.

Check electrical components serving the compressor, may need new start relay and capacitors.


Install new compressor, pressure test, evacuate and recharge.

Now also consider the cost involved against the cost of a new replacement FF with it's own new warranty.

Are you prepared to warranty the repair considering what crap could be inside the system after a compressor failure?


I would like to add to what Brian states.

You should change the drier always, the comp you fit will not always be the same make - model as the one removed. Normaly the new comp will come with electrics so ensure you fit the new comp with the new electrics.

Remove gas
remove comp
remove drier

Then purge OFN (oxygen free nitrogen) through the condenser and through the suction to prove that there is no blockage.
if the system is on R134a and there is a white residue in the cappilary tube then flush the evap and capilary tube with a recognised cleaning agent to ensure the cap tube is perfectly clean.

Fit comp
conect electrics
fit new drier
pressure test
vac system
recharge and run on test.

With no complications (blckages and such) it will take between 1 and 2 hours.

taz

Egan Technical
09-02-2008, 05:15 PM
Thanks Guys, This info will give me good direction when I have to change a compressor. I agree with the comment on the cost of this operation. I guess I would always recommend a new FF unless there is a special reason the customer wants the repair.
Now last question, (I think) Has anyone used these "snap rings" things, are they any good and where can you buy them. Regards.

(Just about to watch the Irish / France rugby match. - I cant bear to look, Cant wait till we play England though :))

Electrocoolman
09-02-2008, 10:19 PM
Hi Egan, Try entering LOCKRING in the search facility.

I assume thats what you are referring to.

Brian_UK
10-02-2008, 12:03 AM
Yep, I've used Lockring on an A/C install without problem.